Digital minimalism

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Photo by Namroud Gorguis on Unsplash

The price of anything is the amount of life you exchange for it.”
— Henry David Thoreau

I just finished the highly anticipated book by Cal Newport, Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life in a Noisy World, and it was every bit of as good as I hoped for.

I couldn’t put it down.

It has been a really long time since I longed to reach for a book in between tiny moments of a movie paused while my boyfriend went to grab something or while we waited for the next episode to start.

The intention of writing this article is to provide a brief summary of Digital Minimalism, focusing on what I found the most useful and highlighting my own journey towards digital minimalism. Continue reading “Digital minimalism”

Unplugging: A digital detox experiment

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Photo by Tookapic on Pexels.com

This post is a way overdue follow up to the National Unplugging Day article I wrote, and my experience unplugging. 

According to a study by the World Economic Forum, digital media users often spend more hours online than they sleep, yet only half believe it improves their quality of life. Not only is increased in screen time found to not improve our quality of life significantly, but it is also found to be tightly correlated with stress, vulnerability to addictive behaviors, and a decline in physical activity.

You can read more statistics on digital use and mental wellness from the Happiness Hack book (highly recommended).

These stats, however, are no longer shocking. It is evident our addiction to our screens and technology is costing us our physiological and psychological health. As a response to the invasive and costly nature of digital addiction, various movements have sprung across the globe to motivate us to build a positive relationship with our digital lives. 

The National Day of Unplugging is such a movement dedicated to a 24-hour long digital sabbatical to unplug, unwind, relax and do things other than using today’s technology, electronics, and social media.

On Friday, March 1st at 7:00pm, I unplugged for the first time in a very very long time by putting away all my electronic devices* for a 24-hour period.

The experience was refreshing and inspiring. Continue reading “Unplugging: A digital detox experiment”

Write for your life

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Photo by Aaron Burden on Unsplash

When Chris from Old Cove Road reached out to me via email to ask if he could share my blog post, How to use your smartphone like a hammer, on his website, I was utterly flattered. So, I went on his website to find out why my article was worthy of being shared, and as I browsed through, his podcast episode titled Write for Your Life caught my attention.

In the episode, Chris explores the necessity of telling our stories, writing being one medium, to break down the stigma and misconception surrounding mental health and mental illness.

I loved the idea: write for your life.

I have mused about the importance of writing for self-exploration in previous posts.

Good writing can help a person discover their voice, and our voice defines our authenticity, which in turn defines our influence. Continue reading “Write for your life”

Self-medicating with art: A guide

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Photo by Debby Hudson on Unsplash

Most of us self-medicate to some degree to manage our emotional needs.

Self-medicating can be defined as a behavior in which an individual uses a substance or any exogenous influence to self-administer treatment for physical or psychological ailments

Self-medicating can be done through the use of drugs, alcohol, and other substances to deal with a plethora of negative emotions, including stress, anxiety, and depression. Some people also self-medicate with excessive food, videogames, or watching TV. 

In other words, we can self-medicate with almost anything as a way to escape from the emotional discomfort or anguish we feel. 

Self-medicating is often harmful because we gravitate towards negative influences to deal with our emotional needs and discomforts. We eat junk food. We light a cigarette. We grab a drink to unwind after work, every single day. We stuff ourselves with cookies and ice-cream to help us forget our sadness.

But, what if, instead, we self-medicated with art to banish our boredom and anxiety?  Continue reading “Self-medicating with art: A guide”