Dear Diary: Keeping a daily journal for mental well-being

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Photo by Rachel Lynette French on Unsplash

Writing can be a very therapeutic endeavor.

Any form of writing, including artistic, academic, or otherwise, can serve as a form of self-therapy, a way to make sense of our thoughts and feelings and discover our deepest desires. One way to incorporate writing into our daily routine is by keeping a daily journal.

In 2009, I wrote my first-ever journal entry on an online diary. By 2013, I have managed to write thirteen entries. Although, I would always promise myself, and my diary, that I will, for sure, write more this time around, it took four years to seriously immerse myself in keeping a daily journal.

Since 2014, I have written 1128 entries, about 280 entries a year. Continue reading “Dear Diary: Keeping a daily journal for mental well-being”

Sleep hygiene: is your sleep dirty?

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Photo by freestocks.org on Pexels.com

In my previous article, titled how to fill our days, I mentioned, rather sarcastically, that we should all denounce the Busyness Olympics, and instead brag about the glorious 7 to 8 hours of sleep we get each night.

Unless there is a legitimate reason for an individual to sacrifice sleep, such as needing to work lots of hours, running multiple side projects, and/or other obligations, everyone should aim to get the recommended 7 to 8 hours of sleep each night, or whatever amount of sleep one needs not to operate on sleep deficiency.

Sleep deficiency is no joke. So much so that it is one of the very few of our biological needs that the science seems to be in unison on— getting enough sleep is vital for our overall health and well-being. Continue reading “Sleep hygiene: is your sleep dirty?”

Stoicism for happiness: the dichotomy of control

Naturally, I stumbled upon stoicism during one of the worst times of my life.

It was fall 2016. I have just started my first semester of grad school and had to take a social theories class that was required for all sociology majors. Quite frankly, that class made me feel so utterly incompetent and useless, I might have considered to mention it on a suicide note that, thankfully, I never got around to. Despite the brilliant and quite interesting professor, I could not figure out Foucault to save my life, and lucky for me, the whole course was on Foucault.

Here’s an accurate depiction of me in that class: 

Continue reading “Stoicism for happiness: the dichotomy of control”

A toolkit for SADness

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Photo by Walid Amghar

Winter is my least favorite season. I really don’t trust people who claim winter to be their favorite season. While I appreciate how beautiful a fresh snowfall can be, the bitter cold, the ungodly short days, and the inability to enjoy most outdoor activities make winter my least favored time of the year.

Finally having realized that I do not do well in the winter months, at least emotionally, and I cannot afford to escape to a tropical destination, I decided to create a SAD survival toolkit this winter. Before I share what is in my SAD toolkit, I would like to begin with a brief introduction of SAD. Continue reading “A toolkit for SADness”

A short introduction to youth peer support

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Photo by Camille Orgel on Unsplash

Peer support is sort of my jam, it is something I feel knowledgeable and very passionate about.

It began back in 2014 when I got the opportunity to volunteer as a Peer Counselor at the Peer Support Centre during my undergraduate studies. After I completed graduate school, I landed a position working as a Youth Engagement Project Coordinator for a children’s mental health hospital to create a peer-based mental health program for youth in the community.

Continue reading “A short introduction to youth peer support”