Where did everyone go?

it will make sense

I had a thought recently: where did everyone go?

I laughed because, living in a big city, I’m constantly surrounded by people. Spending so much time around way too many people, how could I still be longing for, craving, wanting for human connection? A small talk about the weather, a chat about grocery prices at the store, a quick vent session about life at the train station? It used to be.

The answer came to me just as quickly: Everyone is here, online; talking about the weather, complaining about grocery prices, and venting about life on the world wide web.

I’m just not here. And it sucks.

Everyone is talking, but the silence is deafening.

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The loneliest place

The loneliest place has billions of people on it.

The loneliest place promises to connect us with these billions of people worldwide, at any given time of the day.

The loneliest place is where we spend the majority of our time.

The loneliest place is full of noise, chats, arguments.

The loneliest place is supposed to make us feel less lonely.

Not long ago, I used to spend a lot of my time at the loneliest place; engrossed, addicted, alone.

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How we start our days is how we spend our days

If we pay attention, love is everywhere.

And, “how we spend our days is, of course, how we spend our lives.”

Too long, won’t read version: Add an offline activity to the start of your day for better days.

The long version: I paid attention and realized something yesterday. #storytime

I left my Airpods at home yesterday after my phone kindly warned me I’ve exceeded the recommended level for audio exposure. Got me wondering, how else is one supposed to listen to So Mi Like It? I digress…

Anyway, I wanted to give my ear a break, and didn’t want any temptation, so I brought a book instead for my commute. Usually, I’d read an e-book on my phone, while listening to music, switching between this app then that app, skipping this song then that song, you know the usual. On this particular commute, however, it was just my book and I, and my phone stayed in my purse.

Then, the magic happened.

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Is digital declutter for you?

Digital declutter is a very personal journey.

For some, it’s their email inbox that is cluttered and stressful. For others, it’s their desktop overflowing with files and documents.

Below are three ideas to determine if digital declutter is for you.

1. Pay Attention

What, if any, area of your digital space is overflowing and stressful?

Is it the unread emails? Is it the to-read, to-watch, to-listen bookmarked pages? Is it your social media feed? What about your cluttered desktop?

Assess, and determine.

2. Identify Top Offenders

What areas of your digital space is the most cluttered or stressful?

While it could be one or ten, I advise people to pick 1-2 areas to start with.

Digital decluttering can be burdensome because it’s easy to hoard stuff in the digital space since we don’t see the clutter pile up around us. It exists in the cyber space.

Once you declutter one area and see how rewarding it is to keep your digital space clutter-free, you can use that as motivation to move forward with the rest of your digital space.

3. Visualize It

Close your eyes.

Visualize your day with less email to sift thorough when you open you inbox. How about only a handful of apps on your phone? Imagine your desktop super organized with a few folders and you always know exactly where to look for important documents?

Whatever your ideal is, visualize it and feel it.

Does it feel good?


If you have determined digital declutter is for you, and I hope it is, I have a tip to make the experience a breeze— okay, less painful— for you.

Give yourself time, but also put a date on it (oh, oh, oh!)

Rome wasn’t built in a day, but Rome was built. #okurrrrr

Give yourself enough time to tackle decluttering your digital space, but also set a clear timeframe. If you are a tomorrow-junkie like me, postponing everything to tomorrow, setting a specified period of time to tackle a project will be useful.

Personally, I’ve dedicated this month to do a digital declutter, Digital Declutter December. Next week, I will be sharing what areas of my digital clutter I’m simplifying.

Stay tuned!

Until next time. . . 

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Demons hate fresh air

I read Austin Kleon’s Keep Going: 10 Rules for Staying Creative in Good Times and Bad for the third time this year. It’s that good.

Kleon is one of my favourite writers and bloggers. When I discovered him earlier last year, I read his blog all the way back to 2012 and four of his books. I can’t seem to get enough of his timeless advice.

His work is terrific and inspiring.

I came across the quote, demons hate fresh air, in Keep Going and it has stuck with me ever since:

No matter what time you get out of bed, go for a walk and then work, [Ingmar Bergman] would say, because the demons hate it when you get out of bed, demons hate fresh air.

Ingmar Bergman

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