NoSurf: A guide for minimizing mindless browsing

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Photo by Liam Briese on Unsplash

My introduction to the NoSurf community, ironically, happened as I was mindlessly browsing through Reddit, my favorite guilty pleasure, and stumbled upon the NoSurf subreddit, a community for people who want to become more productive by wasting less time mindlessly surfing the internet.

The NoSurf movement does not advocate for quitting the internet altogether. Instead, they advocate for cutting out negative internet use and mindless browsing.

After all, the internet and our digital devices are very valuable tools when used with purpose. I am forever in awe of the amount of information and knowledge available to me online, regarding any topic that might pique my interest, at a click of a button and within literal seconds.

That is indeed powerful.

However, our smartphones, social media accounts, streaming sites, and inboxes are intentionally designed to hijack our brain’s natural reward system, and our brain sees the internet as an easy pathway to trigger happy feelings. This hijacking is costing us our motivation and creativity, as we spend more and more time mindlessly browsing in a zombie-like state.

When your reward system is tuned to expect easy rewards from vicarious onscreen pleasures, why pursue difficult, messy real-world achievements?

What is mindless browsing?

Continue reading “NoSurf: A guide for minimizing mindless browsing”

Mental health and social media

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By now, it is very evident that we can no longer talk about mental health without also mentioning how our increasing addiction to technology, our digital devices, and various online platforms, can negatively impact our mental well-being.

Increasingly, studies are showing the negative effects of social media on our mental health and mental well-being [1]. 

According to a report by Homewood Health, the more time a person spends on social media sites, the more likely they are to suffer from a host of mental health issues. What was more alerting was that such link between social media use and mental health issues was more pronounced for children and teens [4]. 

A study by psychologist Jean Twenge has also found that an increase in teen depression corresponded with technology use, which some are referring to as Facebook depression. Continue reading “Mental health and social media”