Three digital wellness apps I use to tame my digital addiction

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Photo by Jonathan Kemper on Unsplash

Isn’t it ironic that there are apps designed to help us navigate our addiction to the digital world? Fight fire with fire, I guess.

Anyway, as mentioned in previous posts (here for instance), it is entirely impossible for me to use willpower or self-control to manage the time and energy I spend on mindless online activities.

The brain wants to avoid discomfort as much as possible so it will coax us back to the couch, our screens and comfort.  In comparison to digital distractions, everything else seems to require far too much effort.

It is simply too enticing to be idle and scroll through easy entertainment for instant gratification than to get up and do things that require effort, no matter how beneficial they may be. Continue reading “Three digital wellness apps I use to tame my digital addiction”

Upcoming event: Practising digital minimalism in a digitally-caffeinated culture

meetup group event #2 poster

Cal Newport has discovered a cure for the techno-exhaustion that plagues our always-on, digitally caffeinated culture.”
—Joshua Fields Millburn, The Minimalists

Join us for a discussion on how we can incorporate digital minimalism in practical ways that fit our lifestyle perfectly!

We will explore ideas to help us cultivate a sustainable digital minimalist lifestyle, including the importance of solitude, the necessity of cultivating high-quality leisure to replace mindless browsing and joining the attention resistance movement.

Group Website

Event Website

 

What I’ve learned from not browsing on my phone for a month

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Photo by Christian Wiediger on Unsplash

I have been meaning to write a follow-up to my digital minimalism challenge post for the past two weeks now but there is always something easier to do, something more fun, at a tap of a screen.

Most can relate to the challenge of distracting apps and platforms that clutter our lives and make it harder to focus our attention on things we value. Continue reading “What I’ve learned from not browsing on my phone for a month”

Youth cafés: creating youth-friendly spaces

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Photo by Farzad Mohsenvand on Unsplash

Providing physical spaces where young people feel valued and empowered is essential to positive youth development.

Safe spaces for youth should be places where young people can come together to express themselves and engage in decision-making processes that impact their lives. Youth should have an active and on-going role in creating a youth-friendly space, including guidelines, safety protocols, atmospheres, activities, and so forth. Continue reading “Youth cafés: creating youth-friendly spaces”

Kill your phone

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Photo by Simson Petrol on Unsplash

Yesterday, it dawned on me that I’ve finally managed to kill my phone. My phone, in all its capabilities and glory, bores me to tears these days.

I killed my phone two weeks ago when I removed the Safari app, the only app left on my phone that kept me glued to the screen. Besides its basic features, like texting, making phone calls, and taking pictures, the most entertaining app on my phone right now is the Hoopla app, a digital platform for borrowing books from the public library.

Continue reading “Kill your phone”

The joy of missing out

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Photo by Irina on Unsplash

A while back, I was at a nightclub, slightly drunk and perfectly content to be in an establishment that encourages bad decisions when I experienced the joy of missing out.

My favorite songs blasted out of the speakers at deafening levels while bodies pushed against one another and drinks were spilled at an alarming rate.

At some point, between dancing and feeling good, I noticed some people on their phones scrolling through pictures and watching videos.

A thought, then, occurred to me.

I would hate to be bombarded with information about what other people, most of whom I have probably never even met, were doing with their Saturday night while I’m in the middle of enjoying my evening.

I imagined watching my Snapchat feed, or Instagram story, of people who might have been dressed better, surrounded by more people, or doing anything else that indicated they were having a better time than I was.

I was instantly grateful to not have access to that. I enjoyed my night as it was, without comparison or feeling I missed out on something better, something more, somewhere else. Continue reading “The joy of missing out”